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Posts Tagged ‘caregivers’

Traveling with Loved Ones with Dementia

traveling with loved ones with dementiaSummer is typically travel season. Whether you’re flying to a far-off destination or just taking a quick road trip to a great camping ground one or two states over, it’s perfectly understandable to want to bring mom and/or dad.

But what if the loved one you want to bring has dementia? How do you navigate all the hazards of travel with the added burden of someone who may have a tendency to become anxious in unfamiliar settings – or worse, get lost?

Making the Decision

The first step is to determine whether it’s a good idea to travel with a loved one who has a degenerative disease. They may still enjoy traveling in the early stages of the disease, but as it progresses, they’ll need a higher level of supervision and will be more likely to become confused and anxious in new situations. So the first thing to determine is the level of care your loved one needs and whether they can handle the stress of travel.

One thing that can help in determining whether they’re fit to travel is deciding where to go. Generally speaking, travelling to far-off destinations with a different language and different customs can be a lot of fun when you’re young, but to those suffering from dementia, it can be confusing and anxiety inducing. If you do decide to take your loved ones on vacation this summer, make sure it’s to a destination that was familiar to them before they got sick.

Be Prepared

The #1 tip for any successful trip is to plan ahead and prepare for all possibilities. Not only should you make sure you and your loved one are equipped with the proper clothing for all kinds of weather, but you should also plan on bringing plenty of water, their favorite snacks, and all the medications they’ll need for the duration of the trip. In addition to your travel itinerary, make sure to keep a schedule of when they need to take each medication and have the proper medication on hand at the proper time. This will mean planning ahead to take it with you if you intend to do some sightseeing or go for a hike.

In addition to packing all the necessary medications, you should keep an updated list of emergency contacts and copies of important documents.

If you will be staying in a hotel, alert the staff to your needs before you arrive so they can be prepared to help you out during your stay. Keep in mind that new locations can trigger wandering in patients with dementia as they seek out the familiar, so stay alert and take advantage of programs like the MedicAlert® + Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return®.

Timing is Everything

Finally, make sure to travel during the time of day when your loved one is at their best. People with dementia often experience increased anxiety during certain periods of the day, usually around sunset, hence the term “Sundown Syndrome.” Know when your loved one is at their best and when they tend to be at their worst and plan accordingly. During the times of the day that tend to be tough for them, be sure to have something familiar and comforting on hand that you know will help reduce their anxiety.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

Family Conflicts Over Elderly Parents

family conflicts over elderly parentsChildren fighting over what’s best for their aging parents is at least as common as parents fighting over what’s best for their children. Although everyone can agree they want the best for their parents, family conflicts over elderly parents often arise when siblings disagree on what that means.

Ideally, you should have a discussion with your parents before things get bad about the kind of care they want as they age. Powers of Attorney for both healthcare and finances should be determined, and a will should be drawn up, signed and notarized. All the children should be made aware of all these papers and their contents. Hopefully, all the children will also be able to agree on the contents of the papers and leave everything the way their parents laid it out.

But life rarely goes the way we hope it will go.

Instead, there’s generally one child who gets stuck with most of the responsibilities involved in caring for their aging parents. If all but one or two children have moved out of town, it’s usually the child who still lives closest to the parents who sees their deterioration first hand and ends up lending a hand – first with one or two things, but often the burden increases as the parents’ capabilities decline.

This can often leave the caregiver sibling with resentment of their brothers and/or sisters for whom the situation is out of sight and out of mind. They don’t see everything the caregiver is doing for their parents and so they assume everything is fine – not realizing that it’s because of all the work the caregiver is putting in that everything is running so smoothly.

When that happens, the caregiver sibling should detail everything they’re doing to care for their ailing parents and give their siblings a chance to offer their help, either financially or through other means.

But money is also a sore spot and the caregiver can sometimes find themselves accused of spending too much of the parents’ money. The siblings who aren’t there to monitor the situation are often unaware of how bad things have gotten and might become suspicious of the caregiver trying to take advantage of their parents financially.

Again, this is where the caregiver taking the time to list their responsibilities and all the work they’ve been doing can come in handy. This is especially true if the caregiver was forced to quit their job in order to take care of their parents full time, leaving them without any other form of income with which to support themselves.

Unfortunately, that isn’t always enough to resolve the situation, in which case counseling might be needed. This offers the siblings a chance to repair their relationships so they can come together for the good of their parents. Talking over their challenges and frustrations in the presence of a neutral third party can help each side see things from the other’s perspective.

If that still doesn’t work, you might want to find a professional elder care mediator to help mediate your family dispute over your elderly parents.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

Managing Hoarding Behaviors in Patients with Dementia

HoardingHoarding is its own psychological disorder, characterized by an excessive accumulation of objects to the point where it begins to interfere with the person’s life, often by covering just about every available surface in their living area and/or including keeping food and medicine that has gone bad. The person feels distress at the thought of throwing anything away, and while the disorder can be isolated, it can also be paired with other disorders, such as severe anxiety and/or depression. It may make them feel safe to know they have everything they could ever possibly need.

Hoarding can also be found in conjunction with Alzheimer’s or dementia, in which case it may be due more to confusion than out of any fear of throwing something away. Food may have been left to rot because they can’t remember when they bought it and their sense of smell has deteriorated to the point where they can’t tell it’s gone bad. Medications may likewise be left to go bad if the person can’t remember what it is, why they’re taking it, how much they’re supposed to take, when they’re supposed to take it, or when they took their last dose.

Likewise, mail may be left to pile up if they’ve lost the mental capacity for sequential tasking. If that’s the case, then someone will need to sit down and go through the mail with them to make sure no important documents are lost and bills don’t go unpaid.

Patience is A Virtue

As tempting as it is to get frustrated with hoarders and dementia patients (and doubly tempting when the two disorders are combined), it is of the utmost importance to remain calm and speak kindly and gently to your loved one. Remember that they’re not doing any of this on purpose, and if you lash out or yell at them, you’ll make them more confused and anxious, which will make everything worse.

Choose your time to talk about the hoarded objects wisely – specifically when your loved one is in a good mood. Talk them through the process of selecting items to be thrown away – if they haven’t yet lost the ability to appreciate logical reasoning, you might be able to convince them to discard much of what they’ve collected without too much trouble.

Memory Box Technique

The memory box technique is one strategy that has proven to be successful when dealing with hoarders. Choose a box to be their designated place to keep “special things.” You can even decorate it together to make the box both more special and more memorable – this has the added benefit of creating a fun activity you and your loved one can share together. Anything your loved one likes to collect can be put in the memory box, which makes it easy for you to keep track of the accumulation of those items. If their rubber band collection is getting out of control, for example, you can remove some of them and your loved one probably won’t even notice. You can also label and keep items that really are valuable, such as keys and wallets, in the box. That way, when your loved one comes to you looking for something, you can simply suggest they check their box.

How to Handle Someone Who Has Behavioral Problems Due to Dementia

Behavioral Problems Due to DementiaDementia can be scary and confusing for everyone involved. Those with dementia often feel lost, confused, and out of control of their own lives – all of which are terrifying. That fear can sometimes prompt them to lash out violently (either verbally and/or physically) against those around them, which is both painful and frustrating for the targets of their aggression.

So what should you do in such a situation? How can you calm them down and avoid hurting them?

The first step is to educate yourself. Know the signs of dementia and some of the behaviors that might come along with it.

Aggression

This can often start with the patient insisting they want something they can’t have (such as to go “home”) or that they don’t want something they can’t avoid (such as something in the environment, something in their schedule, or even the caregiver themselves). A simple statement can sometimes turn to yelling and may escalate into violence.

As tempting as it can be to argue with them, that’s not helpful. Don’t try to force the issue and don’t restrain them if it’s not absolutely necessary. Instead, try to divert their attention to something else while speaking to them in a calm, measured voice.

Confusion

Statements like “I want to go home” are often the most painful to hear out of someone with dementia who is already home. It means they’ve forgotten where they live, and they want to return to a place where they lived during another part of their lives.

The most important thing to remember is not to argue with someone with Alzheimer’s or dementia because that is an argument you will never win. You cannot reason with someone who is suffering from dementia and trying to do so often only makes things worse.

Depending on the person, explaining the change in their situation, especially through the use of photos and tangible objects, might work, but more often than not it’s best to try to distract them. Suggest going for a walk with them or getting a snack and get them to talk about other things. If they ask things like “When are we leaving?” or “When are we going home?” try putting them off by telling them you can’t leave until traffic clears up or the whether is better. Sometimes a small lie is better than trying to explain to them what they can’t (or don’t want to) understand.

Poor Judgment

This can take a variety of forms – from trouble with finances, to hoarding, to paranoid behaviors, such as accusing a loved one of stealing from them. While some of these strange behaviors are obvious, others take more subtle forms, making them difficult to diagnose. The person with dementia may not even know they’re struggling with something, and even if they do, people are rarely willing to admit they need help.

If you suspect a loved one may be suffering from poor judgment, try to find out quietly. See if you can get a look at one of their bills to make sure they haven’t missed any payments. If that’s not possible, try to have them figure out the tip at a restaurant and see if they struggle any more than they usually do.

The most important thing is to remain encouraging and reassuring. Offer to help in small ways that minimize the other person’s embarrassment. Again, don’t ever try to argue with them, and don’t ask them outright if they’re unable to handle certain situations because that won’t end well.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

Assisted Living Can Actually Improve Happiness

Assisted Living Can Actually Improve HappinessIf you’ve been struggling to convince your parents it might be time for assisted living (or if you’ve putting off the unpleasant conversation), you’re not alone. Assisted living suffers from plenty of misinformation, and despite the reasons you may have for why your parents need assisted living, have you considered how assisted living can actually improve happiness in seniors?

Researchers have long recognized the importance of social relationships on both our physical and mental wellbeing – the more socially connected we are, the happier we are and the longer we tend to live. That social connection could be one of the most important things an assisted living community can provide. In addition to help with daily tasks and medical care as needed, assisted living communities are also one of the best ways senior citizens can stay connected to the world around them.

Staying connected gets increasingly difficult as we get older. Friends and family members pass on; our kids grow up, move out and get their own lives; and staying home rather than going to an office every day means a significant decrease in social interaction. On top of all that, if we get sick or injured, we’re even more likely to stay home, which further inhibits social interaction. Going out gets harder as we age, and if we live alone, the days between visits from friends and family member can appear to grow longer and longer.

While visits from the outside community are always encouraged in assisted living, residents are not dependent on them for their social lives. Not only are they surrounded by people in their age group (many of whom are have similar experiences as they age), but assisted living communities consistently provide several recreational and social activities to encourage residents to get out of their rooms (or even out of the building, if they’re able) and mingle.

It is often by participating in the activities we enjoy most that we end up meeting the people who come to mean the most to us. Spending time with people who enjoy the same things we do is a necessary component of our mental and physical wellbeing. By providing a wide range of activities for their residents to participate in, assisted living communities help bring together people who might not otherwise meet.

What makes it even better is the fact that these interactions can continue long after the program has ended. Sharing an activity with another person is not just a great ice breaker, it can also help create a bond that lasts for the rest of their lives. There are few things more satisfying than turning to someone and saying, “Do you remember that time we …?” and having them remember and be able to commiserate with you over that memory.

Once people get over the initial stress of moving into an assisted living community, they’re more likely to report higher levels of happiness and a greater sense of belonging than they felt before they moved in. The bonds formed in assisted living can then help them live longer, healthier, and more fulfilling lives than they would have had if they had insisted on continuing to live on their own.

Moving into assisted living is not giving up on life. It’s the beginning of a whole new chapter.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

How to Talk to Your Parents About End-of-Life Care

How to Talk to Your Parents About End-of-Life CareIt’s a conversation no one really wants to have. No one likes to think about their own death or the death of their parents. While it may be tempting to put off having this awkward conversation,  here are some suggestions on how to talk to your parents about end-of-life care. It will make things much easier when the worst does happen.

In fact, having a plan in place, and knowing those closest to you are aware of and on board with the plan, can actually make aging easier. It’s a huge load off the mind to know what’s going to happen to your finances and your assets when you’re gone, and to know how you’re going to deal with the physical ailments and limited capacities that come with aging. Things like a will and long-term-care insurance may sound scary, but they’re actually designed to help you prepare for the next stage in life.

Here are some things you need to know about your parents’ end-of-life care, as well as some suggestions for how to broach the subject:

Do they have a will?

A will decides, not just where your money goes, but everything that has value to you – right down to mementos and even pets. And a verbal will isn’t enough. It has to be in writing and signed by you and an attorney. If no will exists that the court can recognize, then a probate court judge will divide the assets and decide who gets what, which can take months and cost the family members thousands of dollars.

Broaching the subject:

Let them know you’re aware it’s an uncomfortable subject, but that you just want to make sure their assets are taken care of the way they would want them to be once they’re gone.

To have a will drawn up, you’ll need to meet with a competent family law attorney who can guide you through the process.

Do they have a power of attorney?

Power of attorney gives another person the power to make legal and financial decisions when the person is no longer capable of making those decisions for themselves. Although you might assume the spouse or nearest relative would automatically be designated power of attorney in the absence of a legally binding document, that’s not actually the case. Instead, a judge will decide who will be the power of attorney, and they may or may not decide to make it the person you always assumed it would be. For example, a spouse without power of attorney can be left unable to access funds or assets to help pay for medical care, so it’s imperative to get a power of attorney put in place sooner rather than later.

Broaching the subject:

Every adult needs a power of attorney, so offer to go with your parents to have both your documents prepared together. If you’d each like to make the other your power of attorney, it would make the moment that much sweeter.

These things aren’t about tempting the Grim Reaper, they’re about accepting the fact that he’ll come sooner or later and it’s better to have a plan in place for when he comes than to leave loved ones high and dry at the height of their grief. Don’t compound the pain of loss by making the process of dealing with everything more difficult for those you leave behind.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

What You Need to Know About Assisted Living

assisted livingIf you think it might be time for you or a loved one to move into an assisted living community, there are a few things you need to know. In addition to considering the level of care you need to look for, we’ve come up with a list of a few other factors you need to consider before you start looking for an assisted living community.

The Difference Between Assisted Living and a Nursing Home

The first thing you need to determine is whether you should be shopping for an assisted living community or a nursing home because it’s important to remember they are not the same thing.

While assisted living communities provide different levels of care depending on the facility and on each patient’s needs, assisted living communities generally do not provide anything beyond help with daily tasks. This can include things like help with remembering to take your medications, but they can’t prescribe medications or fill your prescriptions for you.

A nursing home generally provides a level of care between that of a nursing home and a hospital. They maintain a staff of nurses, have doctors visit regularly to check up on patients, and maintain relationships with local hospitals to help manage patients who might need to go from the nursing home to a hospital and vice versa.

The Available Levels of Care Differ Between Communities

There is no single definition for assisted living, although every state has its own laws regulating assisted living communities. While some provide just the basic level of care in helping with daily tasks, others provide more extensive care to those who need help eating and/or can’t get out of bed. Doing your research ahead of time and considering all your options can help you make the best decision when it comes to getting the care you need while maximizing comfort and minimizing costs.

Affordability

Paying for assisted living can be easier than you think. Again, it depends on the level of care you need and making sure you do your research ahead of time. Once you’ve determine your requirements for an assisted living community, it’s a simple matter of knowing what your options are and comparing the pros and cons of each community until you find the one that’s right for your needs.

You Are Able to Bring Your Pet

Every assisted living community has their own guidelines and restrictions when it comes to pets, but we welcome you bring your furry friend! We even have a built in dog park in the back!

You Can Continue Living with Your Spouse

Assisted living communities understand the importance of keeping couples together and many of them will work to make that an option whenever possible. Most of them even offer customized bills so that if your spouse needs more care than you do, or vice versa, the community will only bill you for the services you use, even if you and your spouse live in the same unit.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

What to Say to a Loved One Who Doesn’t Want to Move into Assisted Living

assisted livingMany of us dread the day we have to face facts and acknowledge that it’s time for Mom and/or Dad to move into assisted living. Many people maintain outdated ideas of what assisted living is like, imagining the dreaded “old folks’ home,” sometimes referred to as “heaven’s waiting room.” Many people see the move to assisted living as the last step before death, which is why they resist it so strongly.

But you know better. Not only do you know they need assisted living, but you know how full of life a good assisted living community can be. Here are some things you can say to your loved one to convince them of what you already know:

“It’s safer.”

The number one concern for seniors who have an increasing amount of difficulty in moving around is that they might fall and be unable to get help if they’re injured. A personal safety alarm can help alleviate some of this fear, but what if they live alone, they fall, and they can’t set off their alarm? Or what if they forget to turn off the stove/oven while they’re cooking and there’s no one around to remind them to turn it off before it starts a fire? Assisted living can help prevent such catastrophes, while giving residents as much privacy as possible.

“Wouldn’t it be nice not to have to worry about taking care of this big house anymore?”

Taking care of a home is a lot of work and it gets increasingly difficult to find the energy for it all as we get older. Residents in assisted living don’t have to worry about shoveling snow, raking leaves, mowing their lawn, or any of the other hassles associated with living in their own home. They can continue cooking and cleaning for themselves as long as they’re able, but most of the responsibilities that come with property ownership fall on the shoulders of the assisted living community, freeing up the residents to rest and save their energy for other tasks.

At the same time, if residents have trouble cooking and/or cleaning, assisted living can also provide help in that area and do so in a way that’s comfortable and easy for the resident.

“You won’t lose your privacy.”

Privacy is also a big concern for those who are used to living in their own home, but most assisted living communities maintain an apartment-building style and provide residents with only the care they need. If residents want help with day-to-day tasks, while maintaining as much of their privacy and independence as possible, assisted living is ideal for providing all those needs at a price your loved one can afford.

Take Them on a Tour

If all else fails, take them on a tour. Let them see the units for themselves and have staff explain exactly what they can expect if they were to move in. It’s the best way to dispel the outdated fears they might have about assisted living.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

How to Make Healthier Choices While Enjoying the Holidays

Healthier Choices While Enjoying the HolidaysThe holidays tend to be a dreaded time of year for all ages who are trying to maintain our weight, or even shed some pounds. When we’re surrounded by so many unhealthy treats, what can we do to make healthier choices while enjoying the holidays?

BYOF

When going to a holiday party, ask if you can bring a veggie tray or other healthy dish you know you love. That way you’ll know there will be something there you can eat. If you’re going out to a restaurant with some friends, look at the menu ahead of time (not when you’re hungry), choose the healthiest option and stick to it when you get there and place your order. Don’t even consider any other options.

Eating before you go out to a party or restaurant is also a good way to keep your calories and portion size down and make sure you know exactly what you’re eating.

Don’t Stand Next to the Food

Most parties have one room where all the food is laid out. Avoid that room. If you’re hungry, make yourself a plate with the healthiest offerings, sit down and eat it, and be done. The most important thing to avoid is eating all night long, and one of the best ways to avoid that is by loading up on healthy food right away. That, combined with keeping a safe distance from the food table after that will help you avoid all the tempting sweets.

Drink Water

We tend to consume a lot of alcohol around this time of year and that’s not healthy. It’s high in sugar, which spikes our blood sugar, which in turn makes us eat more when the sugar crash comes. It’s also hard on our livers, so if you do decide to indulge in some festive drinks this time of year, keep it to one alcoholic drink per party. The rest of the time, stick to water, which will help keep you hydrated. Make it sparkling water with some lime and it will look and feel like a gin and tonic, but your body won’t punish you for it the next morning.

Three Bites

When indulging in unhealthy foods, some people practice the “three-bite rule,” which means they enjoy three bites of it, and then they’re done. If you’re eating a piece of cake, three bites is usually about half the piece, depending on how big the slice is. Three bites could also be one cookie, brownie, or a couple pieces of fudge. Besides, after three bites you tend to stop really tasting it anyway, at which point you’re just shoving food in your mouth because you’re high on the combination of fat and sugar.

Talk

The point of parties is to see friends and family, new and old. Look at holiday parties not as a chance to stuff yourself with food and alcohol, but to talk with your friends and family members and even meet new people. Ask them how they’re doing and what they’re looking forward to next year. If you don’t know them, ask how they know the host(ess). If you’re talking, you can’t be eating.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

The Benefits of Yoga for Seniors

yoga for seniorsYoga enthusiasts have been touting its health benefits for years, and although it’s gained dominance among young and middle-aged women, there’s no reason you can’t continue to benefit from yoga as you advance into your golden years.

If anything, seniors might need yoga more than anyone else. As our bodies and minds start to deteriorate, it’s more important than ever to maintain a health regimen to help keep us as strong and active as possible for as long as possible.

Strength and Balance

There are many yoga poses that focus on strengthening our legs and core muscles, all of which are necessary for maintaining balance and preventing falls. Since falls can be a very serious risk for many seniors, anything we can do to prevent them (including regular yoga) is a good idea.

Flexibility

It’s no secret that our bodies tend to stiffen as we age, making some movements and daily activities increasingly difficult. Yoga focuses on flexibility in many of its poses, and has been proven to help manage osteoarthritis in women.

Respiration

Physical exercise often becomes more difficult for many of us who experience reduced respiratory functions as we age. This can have far-reaching effects throughout the mind and body, making us stiffer and more prone to disease as the oxygen to various parts of our bodies becomes limited.

Recent studies have shown that yoga had a significant positive impact on the respiratory function of elderly women. Like improved flexibility, improved respiratory function will also make it easier to perform day-to-day tasks and keep up with all your favorite activities.

Blood Pressure

Seniors are at an increased risk for high blood pressure (also known as hypertension). Not only can it cause of heart disease and stroke, it has also been linked with kidney disease.

Oxidative stress is a leading cause of high blood pressure, and yoga has been shown to reduce oxidative stress in older practitioners.

Anxiety

Have you ever listened to a yoga instructor when they’re teaching? Their voices are always calm and measured and apparently designed to make you fall asleep, but you can’t fall asleep because you’re exercising. It’s wonderful, and when yoga is practiced on a regular basis, it has been shown to reduce the body’s sympathetic nervous system, which makes us feel less anxious.

Many studies have linked anxiety to inflammation, which in turn has been connected to a wide variety of illnesses – from diabetes to heart disease to certain types of cancer. Reducing anxiety, not only allows you to feel better and enjoy life more, it’s also an effective way to stay happy and healthy.

Mindfulness

In addition to the physical aspect of yoga, there’s also a strong mental component. You are encouraged to focus on your breathing, which helps you build a stronger relationship with your body. The more you practice yoga, the more you become aware of your thoughts and emotions, which in turn allows you to be more mindful of and connected to everything and everyone around you. It’s a powerful feeling that makes it well worth it to spend an hour once or twice a week on yoga.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.