(618) 692-CARE (2273)

Posts Tagged ‘Seniors’

What Are the Risk Factors of Glaucoma in Seniors?

glaucoma in seniorsThe term glaucoma refers to various eye disorders, all of which are progressive and tend to result in damage to the optic nerve (which is a bundle of roughly one million nerve fibers that are responsible for transmitting visual signals from the eye to the brain). Glaucoma is considered to be loss of vision as a result of damage to the nerve tissue.

Primary open-angle glaucoma is the form of glaucoma patients experience most often, and it’s caused by an increase in the pressure of the fluid in the eye. Such pressure can cause gradual damage to the optic nerve over time and loss of nerve fibers. It can ultimately result in vision loss and even blindness.

1) How Old You Are

Most people over 60 are at risk, but African Americans tend to experience an increased risk after age 40. After these markers, the risk for glaucoma goes up each year.

2) Your Race

African Americans are more likely than Caucasians to develop glaucoma and to experience permanent vision loss as a result. Asians are more likely to develop angle-closer glaucoma, with people of Japanese descent being especially more likely to get low-tension glaucoma. Latin Americans are most at risk in very elderly populations.

3) Your Family History

If your family has a history of glaucoma, you’re more likely to develop it yourself.

4) Other Medical Conditions

Having certain medical conditions can increase the chances you’ll also develop glaucoma. Heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and low blood pressure have all been linked to glaucoma. Many people worry about high blood pressure (which can cause vision loss from glaucoma if left untreated), but few people worry about their blood pressure getting too low (hypotension). Nevertheless, hypotension is as serious a medical condition as hypertension and can cause damage to the optic nerve, resulting in vision loss.

5) Physical Injuries In And Around The Eye

Getting hit in the eye isn’t just extremely painful, it can also cause the pressure in the eye to escalate, either immediately after the injury and/or some time after the incident itself. Severe trauma to the eye can also dislocate the lens, which causes the drainage angle to close, thereby increasing pressure on the eye and causing all sorts of problems.

6) Other Risk Factors Related To The Eye

The anatomy of the eye itself varies slightly from person to person and the unique way your eyes are constructed might put you at an increased risk for glaucoma. For example, how thick your cornea is and the appearance of your optic nerve can both provide an idea of your personal risk for glaucoma. Conditions you might have developed over time, such as retinal detachment, tumors and any kind of inflammation in or around the eye, can all cause and/or exacerbate glaucoma. Some studies have also suggested you might be at increased risk for glaucoma if you’ve experienced a lot of nearsightedness.

7) Use Of Corticosteroids

Use of corticosteroids for an extended period of time has been linked to secondary glaucoma.

Glaucoma is a frightening prospect that can seriously inhibit our independence along with our vision. Because age is a primary factor in the development of glaucoma, you should be especially vigilant in looking out for it as loved ones get older, especially if they have one or more of the other risk factors.

At Stillwater Senior Living, we do everything we can to answer the questions of our seniors in our community. If we do not have the answer, we will find someone that does.

CONTACT US TODAY for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

Tips For First Time Caregivers

tips for first time caregiversBecoming a caregiver is something we rarely plan for. Few children say, “I’m going to be a caregiver when I grow up,” but when faced with age and/or chronic illness, many people do turn to their grown children or other family members for help in dealing with their newly-fragile state, including some of the more basic aspects of day-to-day care.

If you now find yourself thrust into the position of caregiver and don’t know where to begin, we’ve got some tips for you:

Get Informed

Whatever medical issues your loved one is dealing with, you should make sure you at least know the basics. What are the typical outcomes? Treatments? Side effects of the medications? You should know as much as you can because you’re going to be the one dealing with them. This can mean a quick internet search (or very intensive internet search, depending on your research style), asking a librarian or bookseller for book recommendations, and talking to medical professionals who specialize in that field.

It should also mean you’re present at doctor’s meetings. Patients often fail to ask their doctors the right questions (or any questions) or they forget to mention symptoms. As a caregiver, you are responsible for acting as your loved one’s advocate and nowhere is that more important than the doctor’s office. Not only do you have to keep the doctor informed of all developments, but you are in the best position to make sure the patient takes all their medication when they’re supposed to, gets the prescribed exercise, eats right, etc.

Get Help

Aging can be a lonely time of life for many people, but sometimes the caregiver can also be left feeling isolated. Even if you’re surrounded by friends and family, they might not understand what you’re going through or the specific challenges associated with being a caregiver.

Fortunately there are communities out there to provide support, advice, and a sympathetic ear. There are online communities as well as ones that meet in person. You can check MeetUp.com to see if there are any groups in your area already meeting to discuss these things. If not, you can start your own group. Either way it’s important to know you’re not alone.

Take Care Of Yourself

As any mother will tell you, when you’re caring for someone else, it can be easy to forget to take care of yourself, and what little time we do spend in self care can often leave us feeling guilty. But the fact is that taking care of yourself is an important aspect of taking care of your loved one. If you’re not at your best, then you won’t be able to provide the best care. So make sure you eat right, exercise regularly, and take time to enjoy some of your favorite hobbies every now and then. You and your charge will both be better off for it.

And remember there’s no reason you can’t make taking care of yourself part of taking care of your loved one. You’re probably in charge of their meals anyway, so while you’re cooking up something delicious and nutritious for them, make some for yourself. Consider what exercises they’re capable of and exercise together. Do a puzzle together. Read out loud to them. Taking care of them will be a lot of hard work, but there’s no reason it can’t also be fun every now and then.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

The Importance of Companion Pets In Assisted Living

Companion Pets In Assisted LivingIt’s National Pet Month, and while the health benefits of pets have been long established, we would like to take a few minutes to recognize the importance of companion pets in assisted living and how TRULY beneficial it is.

In addition to all the well-known health benefits that pets provide to all of us (lowered blood pressure, lower stress levels, lower cholesterol, etc.) pets can also provide companionship and a sense of purpose at a time of life that can often be lonely. Pets provide unconditional love, companionship, and nonverbal communication, which, for many seniors, can be just what the doctor ordered.

While walking a dog provides good cardiovascular exercise, it can also be a bridge to socializing with others. A dog isn’t just man’s best friend, he can also be man’s best wingman. Try walking a friendly, good-looking dog in any well-populated area and you’ll have people wanting to pet your dog and other dogs wanting to introduce themselves to your dog. It’s a great icebreaker for talking to other people in your community, especially other dog owners, and can help alleviate some of the feelings of isolation that come with getting older.

Assisted living facilities that allow animals have noticed how beneficial they can be with new residents, who are often especially withdrawn and uncommunicative. Sometimes a resident’s first significant interaction in the facility is with an animal, and that opens a pathway to talking with other residents and staff.

Taking care of a pet can also provide seniors with a sense of worth and boost their self-esteem. At a time when many people start to feel like they’re no longer contributing anything to the world, a pet can help reduce those feelings by assuring seniors they are needed and loved.

Pet therapy has also been proven to be especially useful in helping seniors deal with “Sundowner’s Syndrome,” a condition in which those with Alzheimer’s suffer periods of increased confusion and agitation in the evenings. Animals can help soothe patients during these tough times with their non-verbal communication and unconditional acceptance of the patients. For some seniors, it can even serve as a reminder of a pet they had when they were growing up, which can help to calm them.

As vital as pets can be to those living in assisted living facilities, buildings that allow their residents to have pets need to be careful that the needs of both the patient and the pet are being met. If the patient is forgetful and doesn’t always remember to feed or walk their pet, they may need help from the assisted living facility staff. After all, seniors tend to move to an assisted living facility because they need help with certain day-to-day tasks of living and taking care of themselves. While the fact that they need help taking care of themselves does not necessarily mean they can’t take care of an animal, it might mean it would be a good idea for the staff to keep an eye on the animal and make sure they are not being neglected. In order to avoid this problem, some assisted living facilities might choose to keep pets in the building that are in the charge of the staff, but that are available to spend time with all residents.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

How To Recognize Signs That It’s Time For Assisted Living

time for assisted livingMaking the choice to put a loved one into an assisted living facility can be one of the most difficult choices we have to make as adults. It can be a painful process that’s often met with resistance from those who are most in need of assistance with day-to-day chores and activities, but you must remain firm. In order to do that, it helps to know for sure that it really is time for your loved one to go to an assisted living facility.

You’re Afraid To Leave Them Alone

Even the most capable of us have times when we forget to turn off the oven or unplug the iron, but if it happens regularly, it might be time to consider an assisted living facility. Many people can continue taking care of themselves well into their golden years, but if your loved one appears to be slipping in even the most basic aspects of self-care, you should probably start looking for an assisted living facility for them.

Changes in Housekeeping

Failing to maintain their normal level of cleanliness around the house and/or hoarding can both be signs that their ability to care for themselves is declining and they need help.

The Level Of Care They Need Continues To Rise

Many people try to take care of their senior friends and family members themselves by having them live with them. This can be a great way to make sure they remain an active part of the family, but if the amount of care they need rises too high, it can become a problem for all of you. There’s only so much friends and family can do, and when the level of care needed by the senior citizen starts to rise above and beyond what you can provide, it’s time to start looking for professional help.

Wandering

Wandering can be one of the earliest signs of cognitive decline if your loved one tries to go to a store that no longer exists or insists on shopping at odd hours. When that starts to happen, their confusion could potentially put them in dangerous situations. You can do your best to keep an eye on them, but you cannot possibly watch them 24/7. What you’ll need instead is an assisted living facility with the resources necessary to care for your loved one and make sure they don’t wander off.

Paranoia

Paranoia can take all sorts of forms, from hiding money in various places around the house to outright accusing friends and family members of trying to harm or trick them. It’s a common sign of aging, as well as cognitive decline from a variety of sources (Alzheimer’s, stroke, etc.). It can be especially difficult to convince a paranoid senior to move into an assisted living facility, but it’s more necessary than ever. Paranoid individuals can often end up hurting themselves by accident and no one wants to take that risk with their loved ones.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we treat our residents like family. Our apartments include studio, one bedroom, and two bedroom suites. They are designed with security features, maximum accessibility, and include walk-out patois with a full range of amenities for the entire family.

CONTACT US today for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

How To Talk To Your Kids About End-Of-Life Care

end-of-life careNot everyone wants to think about what will happen as they age, especially when it comes to considering possibilities like dementia or a stroke leaving them incapable of making decisions about their own health. But the fact that those possibilities are so frightening is exactly why it’s important to talk to your children about end-of-life care now, before things take a turn for the worse.

Nevertheless, many people continue to put off having this extremely important conversation because it makes them so uncomfortable. Here are some ways you can ease the stress on both you and your children.

1) Plan ahead.

By doing your research ahead of time, you can plan for what comes next. Know what the average costs of end-of-life care are and put a plan in place for how you’re going to pay for it. Even if you don’t currently need an assisted living facility, doing your research and knowing where you want to go if it comes to that can make the transition that much easier on both you and your children.

Not only will this step make you feel better, it will make the idea more palatable for your children. Even those who don’t want to think about what’s coming will most likely find comfort in knowing there’s a plan in place and what that plan is. It will let them see it’s not so bad after all and will create a guideline for them to follow when it’s time to put the plan into action.

Be sure to write everything down and make sure everyone involved has a copy so there will be no second-guessing in the event of an emergency.

2) Talk about it early and often.

You don’t necessarily need to have one big Talk with your children about what they should do as you age. You can drop it into conversations throughout your lives together. As situations arise with friends and family, you can mention what you want done if you ever end up in a similar situation. Make it a two-way conversation by asking them what they think they would want if they found themselves in a vulnerable position. It can help introduce empathy into the discussion by forcing them to consider the situation from the other side, making them more likely to see things from your perspective, and by extension, respect your wishes.

3) Use media to help you broach the subject.

No one likes to hear the words, “We need to talk,” and trying to start a conversation that way can sometimes have the unintentional effect of making everyone defensive before the conversation has even begun. In order to avoid that, you can watch a show or movie together that addresses the issue. Talk about a book or show them an article you recently read on the topic. Use that as an icebreaker to start discussing the issue in general before moving on to what you specifically want to happen at the end of your life.

At Stillwater Senior Living, we do everything we can to answer the questions of our seniors in our community. If we do not have the answer, we will find someone that does.

CONTACT US TODAY for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

10 Healthy Hobbies for Seniors

hobbies for seniorsHobbies are a great way for retired citizens to stay active, both physically and mentally and the importance of having a hobby in our golden years is backed up by an increasing body of evidence. If you or a loved one are considering what to do with your retirement years, here are 10 healthy hobbies seniors can start/develop.

1) Volunteering

One of the most detrimental effects of retirement is it tends to make people feel like they are no longer useful. It often leads to them feeling cut off from society, which in turn leads to depression and a variety of health issues. Volunteering can combat those feelings by giving seniors a purpose again and a way to become active in the community.

2) Exercise

We’re all told to exercise and maintain physical activity throughout our lives and it’s even more important to continue doing so as we age. From walking to yoga there’s something for everyone, including those whose mobility is limited as they get older. Swimming is especially popular among seniors who often suffer from joint pain as a result of lost cartilage.

3) Gardening

Many studies have been done on the health benefits of gardening. To start with, it gets you outside and moving, both things that are known to boost mood, immune system function, and overall health. You can make it an even healthier activity by growing some of your favorite fruits and vegetables.

4) Music

Whether singing, dancing, playing a musical instrument, or all three, music is a great way to keep minds and bodies feeling young. It’s enjoyable, provides mental and physical stimulation, and can be done with a partner or in a group for an added social aspect.

5) Games

Psychologists have long known about the long-term health benefits of things like crossword puzzles and that continues to be true for all mentally challenging games. People of all ages who play games like Scrabble and chess exhibit enhanced cognitive function.

6) Arts and Crafts

There’s nothing like creating something with your own hands. Arts and crafts can keep seniors active, maintain/improve their coordination, and provide a creative outlet for their thoughts and feelings.

7) Learn a New Skill

They say you learn something new everyday and that should remain true right up until the end. If you’ve always wondered how to identify birds or poisonous plants, your retirement years just might be the perfect time to find the answers to all those questions that have been plaguing you your whole life – or the last five minutes.

8) Fermentation

If you’ve always wanted to try making your own beer or wine, there’s no time like the present.

9) Creative Writing

Writing is another form of expression and a great option for people of any age. Whether you want to use your retirement years to put together that novel you’ve always wanted to write, or just short stories for your own amusement, creative writing has proven benefits for cognitive and emotional health.

10) Keep a Pet

There’s nothing like have a living, sentient being literally depend on you for survival to make you feel needed and useful. It’s also a symbiotic relationship because having a pet is known to improve mood and immune function while reducing stress and blood pressure.

The need to stay active is so important in the life of a senior. There are many options for seniors to stay active. Here at Stillwater Senior Living, our staff can provide stimulating activities to keep our seniors engaged and occupied. 

CONTACT US TODAY to find out ore and take a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

Tips for Couples Moving Into Assisted Living

couples moving into assisted livingIt can be hard enough to move one family member into an assisted living facility, but what if both parents are still living and one or both of them require professional care? Even if one spouse is perfectly healthy and active, they may not be able to fully care for their ailing partner, especially in the case of degenerative illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s and dementia, in which they need to be monitored full time.

As people continue to live longer, it is becoming increasingly common for people over the age of 60 to report that they are still married, rather than single or widowed. Assisted living facilities all over the country are adapting and coming up with solutions to accommodate the varying needs of aging couples.

Here’s what you can do if you’re thinking about moving your parents into an assisted living facility:

1) Do Your Research

Depending on where you live and your financial situation, you may have a variety of facilities to choose from. Find out what each facility offers, including their options for couples, their ratings, their pay scales, etc.

The earlier you do your research the better. Don’t wait until you already need the facility because then you’ll be pressed for time and an emergency situation might develop. Be prepared with your information so that, as soon as you start seeing warning signs, you can begin talking to them about their options for assisted living.

2) Know the Costs

Long-term care for elderly family members can place a high financial burden on families, and again, the earlier you prepare, the better off you’ll be. In addition to saving early and often, your research into facilities should include the types of payment they receive. Not all of them accept Medicaid and which facilities you can afford will depend on which ones accept the types of payment you can provide.

In the case of couples where one partner needs more assistance than the other, it’s good to know that most facilities only charge each partner for the services they use. This means that, if one partner is still fairly independent while the other needs extensive care, the independent partner will only pay for room and board while the other will be charged for their medical expenses and necessary monitoring.

3) Be Prepared to Compromise

The aging process is different for everyone, but that doesn’t mean couples have to be separated. Just as compromises had to be made when they first moved in and started their lives together, they will be equally necessary when the time comes to move to an assisted living facility. Each partner will have different physical, medical, and emotional needs and it’s important to make sure they all get met. That will inevitably require some sacrifices on both sides, but for many couples, the process of moving into the next phase of their lives in an assisted living facility can be made that much easier if they can stay together.

There are many options available to help a seniors stay together. Here at Stillwater Senior Living, our staff will do everything they can to ensure a smooth transition into the next adventure of their marriage.

CONTACT US TODAY to find out ore and take a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

Nutrition Tips for Seniors

Nutrition Tips for SeniorsAs seniors age, eating well can improve mental acuteness, energy levels, and resistance to illness. A healthy diet can also be the key to a positive outlook on life and staying physically and emotionally fit. Healthy eating does not have to be about sacrificing the foods you love and dieting. No matter your age, eating well should be about tasty, fresh food, and eating with family and friends.

Feed Your Mind and Body

Your age doesn’t matter and neither do your prior eating habits. It’s never too late to change your diet and improve your health. Improving your diet now can help you live longer and stronger, sharpen your mind, and feel better all around. Good nutrition boosts immunity and fights illnesses and toxins. It also keeps your weight in check.   It will help to reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, bone loss, and cancer.

People who eat fruit, leafy green vegetable, fish and nuts packed with omega-3 fatty acids can improve focus, and decrease their risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Antioxidant-rich green tea may help enhance memory and mental alertness as you age. Wholesome meals give you energy and help you look and feel better. When your body feels good you feel happier inside and out.

Create a Healthy Diet

The key to a healthy diet is to focus on the food your body needs as you age. Food that is closest to its natural form is best. Our bodies respond differently to different foods.   It depends on our genetics and other health factors, so finding a diet that works may take a little experimenting.

Fruit—Instead of the usual apple or banana got for different things like berries or melons. Try for 2-3 servings per day.

Veggies–Choose dark, leafy greens rich in antioxidants like kale, spinach and broccoli. Also, include other colorful veggies like carrots and squash. Try for 2-3 cups each day.

Calcium—Maintaining good bone health as you age is very important. Bone health depends on an adequate calcium intake to prevent osteoporosis and bone fractures. Older adults need 1,200mg of calcium per day through servings of milk, yogurt, or cheese. Non-dairy sources of calcium include tofu, broccoli, almonds, and kale.

Grains—Be smart and choose whole grains over processed white flour for more nutrients and fiber.

Healthy fats—Fat is very dense in calories, so a little can go a long way in making you full and keeping you full longer. Check out The Fat Debate for more on saturated fats and how they can help you maintain a healthy weight.

Protein—Adults over 50 without kidney disease or diabetes need about 1 to 1.5 grams per kilogram (2.2lbs) of bodyweight each day.

Vitamins and Minerals

Water—As you get older, you are prone to dehydration because your sense of thirst may not be as sharp as it once was. Sip water regularly to avoid UTI’s, constipation, and confusion.

Vitamin B—After age 50, your stomach produces less gastric acid, making it difficult to absorb vitamin B12. You need vitamin B12 to keep blood and nerves healthy. Get the recommended daily intake of 2.4mcg from food or a vitamin supplement.

Vitamin D—As you age, your skin is less efficient at synthesizing vitamin D. Consult your doctor about supplementing your diet.

Cut Down on Sugar

While our senses of taste and smell diminish with age, we can still distinguish sweets the longest, making many older people consume more sugar and refined carbs, which isn’t healthy. Unlike complex carbs that are fiber-rich, refined carbs like refined sugar, can lead to a big spike in blood sugar, followed by a rapid crash that can leave you feeling hungry and prone to overeating.

Reducing the amount of starches, candy, and desserts in your diet is only part of the answer. Sugar is hidden in foods like canned soups and vegetables, pasta sauce, and frozen dinners. All this hidden sugar doesn’t contribute any nutrients. All it can do is wreck a healthy diet.

Many seniors need help maintaining a proper diet. There are programs out there like Meals on Wheels that will deliver nutritious, balanced meals to seniors at home.

Here at Stillwater Senior Living, we provide dining options for our seniors who can’t or don’t want to cook for themselves. We do our best to help our residents maintain a healthy, well-balanced diet.

CONTACT US TODAY for more information and a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

Four Ways Assisted Living Helps Seniors to Get Involved

help seniors to get involvedIt is so important that seniors find meaningful things to do during their golden years. They tend to have more time on their hands than they had in the past. It has been proven through research that a sense of purpose may improve a senior’s physical and emotional health. This in turn could lead to a longer life. Today’s assisted living communities know how important socialization and activities are to the needs of their residents. They are doing their best to offer several different options, including community involvement, socialization, and entertainment. This can help their residents live longer and happier lives.

Assisted living communities encourage seniors to get involved by realizing the varying degree of their abilities. They offer several kinds of activities so there is something for everyone to get involved in. This will allow a resident to choose an activity that is both interesting to them a fitting to their needs and abilities.

Here are four different ways that senior communities are getting their residents involved:

Field Trips– It can be a shopping trip, a sports game, or a trip to a local museum to soak up culture and history. Besides entertainment, these trips can be helpful in keeping senior’s minds young and engaged, which will improve their mental health.

Classes– What better way to sharpen a senior’s mind than learning a new skill or hobby! The possibilities are endless including painting, cooking classes, book clubs, and computer classes. Computer classes can teach seniors to keep in touch with friends and relatives through social media. Learning to use the internet also helps them to keep up with current events in the news. Book clubs are great for avid readers and encourage conversation among the residents. It’s a great way to make new friends. Cooking classes are great for learning a new skill and exchanging cherished recipes.

Fitness– Many assisted living communities offer classes like yoga or tai chi. Some communities even have personal trainers and physical therapists to help create senior-friendly workouts to encourage healthy living habits. Dancing is also a great way for seniors to get exercise. You can hold a Friday night dance party to get seniors to socialize and stay active. It keeps residents social and physical fit.

Volunteering– Many seniors find meaning and purpose through volunteering. They can hand out brochures to prospective new residents, help to give tours of the community, help others wrap gifts for the holidays, and sit with a sick friend so they don’t have to be alone. Putting a smile on the face of a neighbor is sure to put a smile on their own face.

The need to stay involved is so important in the life of a senior. There are many options available to help a senior stay involved. Here at Stillwater Senior Living, our staff can provide stimulating activities to keep our seniors engaged and occupied.

CONTACT US TODAY to find out ore and take a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.

Understanding Options and Terms in Today’s Senior Care

Options and Terms in Today’s Senior CareFinding senior living options isn’t easy, and it can be confusing. The number of Americans 65+ will increase by 3% each year over the next 20 years. By the year 2030, there will be over 70 million people over the age of 65. According to the Department of Human Services, the senior population will grow faster than the total population in all 50 states. Aging comes with adaptation and change, and there are many senior housing options to choose from. While most seniors want to stay home, this may not be the safest or least expensive option. In fact, at least 60% of seniors looking at nursing homes end up choosing an active senior living community.

More Option for Different Levels of Care

Finding senior living options can be a confusing process. Loved ones aren’t aware of all their options and they don’t know where to start looking. A recent survey found that most families start their search by looking at nursing homes. However, people looking at nursing homes rarely move into them. Out of 100 people looking at nursing homes, 59% of them end up choosing an active senior living community.

Senior housing options have increasingly evolved over the last 20 years, which could explain a lot of the confusion. Nursing homes are not synonymous with assisted living, which most people believe. Nursing homes used to be the main type of place for long-term care. Today’s nursing homes are mainly set up for short-term stays after a stay in the hospital to recover or have physical therapy.

Physical, mental, and financial health are the factors that contribute to a senior’s long-term and short-term care options. These three things determine the level of care that is needed based on financial resources, and there are many different options of care.

Assisted Living Offers an Extended Quality of Life

A variety of care allows active seniors to thrive because many senior living communities provide physical, mental and emotional stimulation in addition to medication management and nutrition. The socialization aspect of community living helps keep seniors happy, active, and alert. With varying levels of care, families can choose the best option for their loved ones. The great part about this is that many communities offer options where seniors can go through different levels of care as they get older.

Researching Senior Living Options

If you are planning your retirement or looking for a place for your loved one, there are many resources available to help guide you. It doesn’t matter if you are looking for an active senior living community or skilled nursing care, a senior living adviser can help to educate you and provide financial and senior living resources to match the needs of your family.

There is no need to search for nursing homes when there are other options available that are more appropriate. Today’s senior living options offer more personalized care. Here at Stillwater Senior Living, our staff will design a personal care plan that is tailored to the needs of your loved one.

CONTACT US to find out more and take a tour of our beautiful state-of-the-art community.